How to Apply Fresh Aloe Vera on Hair

Applying fresh aloe vera gel directly from the plant to a burn on your skin might come second nature to you, especially if your grandma helped raise you. You've at least once experienced the healing super power of a little aloe on a wound.

However, when it comes to putting it on your hair? That could feel a little like a cousin hug at your extended family Christmas.

Can we apply aloe vera directly on hair? We absolutely can. And just like it instantly helps soothe skin issues, aloe vera gel goes a long way to naturally boost the health of your hair. Let's answer a few of the most common questions about using this power plant and then review how to transfer its superpowers straight to your hair.

Read: Benefits of Aloe Vera for Hair and Scalp

Can I use raw aloe vera on my hair?

Using raw aloe vera is one of the best ways to get the most important qualities of the plant directly to your hair and scalp. While you can use ingredients like honey and oils to make masks or leave in conditioners with your aloe vera gel, it's perfectly safe and super healthy to scoop it right out of a leaf and massage it in to your locks.

When you use raw aloe vera on your hair, you're coating it in powerful vitamins like A, C, and E, scrubbing your scalp with mega antimicrobials, and giving it a major moisture boost. Did you know aloe vera gel is 99% water? And you can shoot that straight in to your hair!

Fresh aloe vera on old wood

How long are you supposed to leave raw aloe vera in your hair?

Since aloe vera is 100% natural and 1,000% good for you, you can leave it in your hair overnight if you want. When using it as a deep conditioning mask, it's really good to coat your hair in aloe vera gel, wrap it with saran wrap or a shower cap, and go to sleep! Follow your normal morning wash routine and watch your hair shine with the benefits of raw aloe vera.

You an also use it during the day as a leave in conditioner. Mix it with some water, put it in a spray bottle and go to town. Use aloe vera as a quick 15 minute moisturizing treatment, too.

Coat your hair and scalp, wrap it in a towel, set your timer and relax. It's like a micro spa experience right at home. You can also use mix it with your shampoo or create your own homemade aloe vera shampoo made with other natural ingredients.

Can we apply aloe vera to oily hair?

Aloe vera gel is an amazing way to treat oily hair! It's full of anti-inflammatory agents that can help soothe hair follicles and slow down ramped up oil production. You'll notice your scalp feels less itchy and may even have less dandruff.

Aloe vera contains natural traces of ethanol and acetone that work as fungus fighters within your follicles, scrubbing your scalp clean and creating a healthy balance of oil production and hair growth.

A clean, healthy scalp is the base for everything about your hair-how oily or dry it is, how much you lose each day, and how healthy your strands are. Aloe vera is an awesome beauty aid when it comes to supporting the health of your hair from roots to ends.

Now that we've taken aloe vera for your hair from a "cousin hug" to a best friend embrace, lets talk about how to get raw aloe vera gel from the plant to your hair.

How to cut aloe vera plant for hair

Aloe plant in a pot isolated on white background

Getting a leaf from your aloe vera plant is super quick and easy!

While you can simply snap a leaf off, your plant will look better long term if you use a sharp knife or kitchen scissors to cut a leaf instead. This will prevent tearing and unhealthy edges on your plant. If you've got a lot of hair, you will want to use longer, broader leaves that will yield more gel.

It's best to rinse your aloe vera leaf before extracting the gel. This will get any dirt off the leaf and keep it out of your hair.

Aloe vera bonus? The leaves will grow back, every time! You've literally got a lifetime supply of raw aloe vera gel at your fingertips. As long as you remember to follow care instructions, that is!

How to extract aloe vera gel for hair

Once you've got your leaf (or leaves) cut from your plant, you're ready to do some harvesting!

Use a sharp knife to carefully "open" the leaf up. Slice it lengthwise so you have two pieces to pull your gel from.

Start scooping! You can use your fingers to scoop out the raw aloe vera gel and work it right in to your hair, from scalp to ends.

Extra tip: it can be tempting to save time by "squeezing" the gel out of your leaf. Try to avoid doing that. You will get more gel slicing your le–af open, and you'll actually be able to store the leftovers. Squeezing the gel out smashes up the leaf and renders it pretty well useless after your first round.

READ: Our Top Picks For The Best Aloe Vera Gel For Hair

How to store aloe vera gel

If you've got leftover gel in your leaf, you can store it and use it for your next hair treatment! Aloe vera gel is best stored in the refrigerator.

To keep it from turning to a brown, mushy, and useless science project, leave the remaining gel in your leaf and put the whole thing in a glass or plastic airtight container. If you have a container that is dark colored, your aloe will last even longer. It will last around 10 days in your refrigerator.

If you want to really make your fresh aloe last, you can freeze it for up to 6 months successfully. Make sure it's in an airtight bag for best results.

Applying fresh aloe vera on your hair may seem a little odd at first, but once you start experiencing cleaner, shinier hair, with less shedding and more volume, it'll become a staple in your beauty routine. The best part? You can buy a plant at most grocery stores and enjoy having your own aloe vera gel right at home whenever you need it. You get to be a micro gardener AND a healthy hair maven! 😉

Image Credit: Deposit Photos

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Last Updated: June 16, 2019

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